Winterizing a Steel Building

Winter is coming, so that makes it a good time to talk about insulating a steel building. Steel is naturally excellent at insulating, because it uses less energy and it can be more water efficient.

Insulating your steel building is will help you keep heat inside your building during the cold winter months. Winter can be harsh on a building; ice and extreme cold can freeze pipes and cause the inner-workings of a home to work overtime. It is, however, easy to take some precautions to help a steel building make it through the winter months unscathed.

Here are a few tips to help you on your way.

  1. First things first – start a list. Are there any “weak spots” in your building, or areas in need of repair? A few days of ice, rain, or hail may make these trouble areas worse if they are not attended to before the cold hits. You may also want to set a budget for insulation, repair and consultation costs associated with winterizing a steel building. Depending on how thorough you need to be, you may require the assistance of a professional to check pipes, look for structural damage and assess the building’s boiler.
  2. Conduct an outside inspection of your building. Make sure hoses and outdoor plumbing is drained to avoid freezing, breaking and leaking.
  3. Make sure doors and gaps are fitted with weather-resistant stripping. This will help avoid drafts and can reduce your heating costs greatly. Check windows, too. Old seals lose much of their insulating abilities.
  4. Leaks can cause a lot of headaches during the winter months. Inspect your roof before the cold sets in, paying special attention to any holes, rips or tears. Keep in mind that rips and cracks don’t just appear in roofs. If you know of any holes in the building’s walls, make sure to repair them as well.

Talk to us to learn more about how you can winterize a steel building.

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